3 Brilliant Tips To Help Your Pet Be Happy When You're Downsizing

3 Essential Steps to Downsizing When You Have a Pet



Downsizing can be stressful for anyone, but it can be especially difficult for senior adults. There is a lot to think about, and it can take a significant toll on you physically, emotionally, and mentally. And when you have a pet, you must ensure that their needs are considered as well as your own.

Pets tend to rely on routine, so when you move them to a smaller living space, you will want to put some extra effort into helping them transition as smoothly as possible. Below, Taranet.co.uk outlines three critical steps to consider when downsizing with your pet.

1. Downsizing Your Belongings



Once you have decided to downsize your home, one of the first things to do is declutter. Go through all of your belongings and choose what to keep, sell, donate, or discard. For the items you want to keep but not immediately move into the new home, you might consider renting a storage unit. If you want to make a little extra cash, consider selling some of your gently-used items online.

This can be a particularly overwhelming time if you are handling estate planning or end-of-life transitions in addition to downsizing. Try to eat well, get sleep, and exercise regularly if you can. Moreover, make sure your pet stays comfortable and has a safe space in your home as you move items to and fro.

Lastly, keep in mind that downsizing your pet’s belongings can be a very stressful time for them. This is especially true when you’re moving homes. However, Bach flower remedies can help settle your pets during these stressful times. It may be important to look into holistic remedies prior to encountering any stressful behaviors from your pet.

2. Sprucing Up the Property



If you plan on selling your home, you will want to make sure the property is in tip-top condition. Think about curb appeal, and start with the landscaping. Plants and flowers are nice, but if you don’t have a well-maintained lawn, you will be hard-pressed to find interested buyers. Consider hiring a professional lawn care service to boost your home’s curb appeal. Search online to find local professionals. Most mowing services average £15 to £40 per hour, but you might pay more if fertilizing, pruning, or other landscaping services are involved.

Next, consider the home itself. Does the siding need to be repainted? Do you need to repair any broken steps or declutter your patio? Perhaps it’s time to patch up the hole in the driveway.

You will want the interior of the home to impress as well. If you have any shabby carpet, consider getting it professionally cleaned or replaced.

Remember that some household cleaning products are poisonous to your pets. Or some can smell very unpleasant to your pet. So choose cleaning options that will help your pet maintain good health.

If your hardwood floors are worse for wear, consider getting them restored, or look into whether it’s worth the investment to replace them. Make sure all of the paint jobs are appealing and depersonalize the decor as much as possible. Just remember to keep receipts and make notes of any changes; these can help raise the value of your property’s appraisal value.

3. Finding a New Home



Chances are you will be looking for a new home before you sell your current one. If you will be taking out a mortgage, figure out your debt-to-income ratio because lenders will use that to estimate what kind of monthly payment you can afford. To get started, you can calculate your DTI by dividing all of your existing monthly debt by your gross monthly income.

One of the best things you can do when trying to sell your home and buy a new one is to hire a real estate agency with expertise in your area. Just remember to consider the needs of your pet along the way. Depending on what type of pet you have, you might want to ensure your new home is in a pet-friendly neighborhood, that the property has a nice backyard with a fence, and that your pet will have easy access to their living space.

Also think about where your new home is. Is it near a park or open space you can walk to, or easily access? Variety in places to walk, and a chance to enjoy different sights and sounds is important for your pet's mental health.

Routine is critical for pets, and downsizing can be especially difficult for them. As you prepare for the next chapter in your life, consider the tips above for downsizing your belongings, boosting the appeal of your property, and finding your new home. And keep looking for other ways you can navigate this challenging time as smoothly and stress-free as possible.

Please remember that if your horse, dog or other animal is unwell. Or on any kind of medication or other supplement. Then always speak to your Veterinary Surgeon first before using any supplement or therapy. Even natural ones. To avoid any possible issues.

And do you know someone who'd find this helpful? Please share, the more we can spread awareness of the benefits of natural therapies the better! :)

Find out more about other natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About The Author
This is a guest post by Cindy Aldridge

How Lemon Balm Can Benefit Your Pet's Health

Love Brilliant Benefits of Natural Lemon Balm For Your Pet



The lemon balm plant (Melissa officinalis) isn’t a citrus fruit like lemon. Instead it’s a member of the mint family and so is a herb. It grows as a bushy, leafy herb with a pleasant lemon smell and small white flowers. It has a distinctive lemon-mint fragrance and flavor,

Is it safe for pets?



According to the American Society for Protection of Animals (ASPCA) it is non toxic to horses, dogs and cats.

Why Use Lemon Balm To Help With Your Pet’s Wellbeing?



Lemon balm has many uses including:
  • As a calming herb that soothes and relaxes.
  • As a digestive aid that neutralizes gas in the stomach and intestines. Ideal if your dog has flatulence
  • Muscle-relaxing
  • Disinfecting, and insect-repelling benefits

Lemon balm contains several properties including tannins, flavonoids, terpenes, and eugenol. Its terpenes are relaxing, the tannins have antiviral effects, and eugenol calms muscle tension and kills bacteria

Where to get lemon balm?



Grow your own lemon balm!

It’s considered by many to be easy to grow, and is happier in poor, sandy soil.

Under the right conditions, it grows like a weed and often is one, taking over entire gardens. Its small white blossoms are so sweet that they attract bees, hence the plant’s scientific name. Melissa is Greek for honey bee.

You can buy lemon balm from pet herbal health care suppliers too.

How to use Lemon Balm for your pet



If you have lemon balm as a fresh herb in your garden, then you can use to keep your dog smelling fresh. Pick a few stems, crush the leaves, and run them over your dog’s coat.

Lemon balm has a citronella-like fragrance. So used for repelling flying insects.

Some dogs are happy to chew on a lemon balm leaf, which can help the breath.

Or use as a tea.

Be aware that ….. Like all mints, lemon balm can counteract the effects of homeopathic remedies. So if a veterinary homeopath prescribes a remedy, check with them whether you can continue to use it.

There are several equine, canine and other pet health supplements that contain lemon balm as one of their ingredients. Try leading suppliers such as Hilton Herbs

Like help finding a holistic veterinary surgeon or complementary therapist for your animal?

Please email me at info at taranet . co. uk

Please remember that if your horse, dog or other animal is unwell. Or on any kind of medication or other supplement. Then always speak to your Veterinary Surgeon first before using any supplement or therapy. Even natural ones. To avoid any possible issues.

And do you know someone who'd find this helpful? Please share, the more we can spread awareness of the benefits of natural therapies the better! :)

Find out more about other natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

How A Holistic Approach Can Help Your Dog With Hip Dysplasia

Hip dysplasia is a condition that can affect many breeds of dogs. Although it's often associated with labradors and golden retrievers. There are other large dog breeds who are more prone to it, such as german shepherds and saint bernards.

So what causes hip dysplasia?



It is hereditary and so genetics play a big part in it developing in your dog. But not all dogs will experience it as bad as others. This can be due to nutrition, exercise and weight for instance.

Many responsible breeders of certain dog breeds, who're prone to hip dysplasia will complete screening, and only breed from dogs where the likelihood of it being present in the puppies is reduced.

What are the symptoms of hip dysplasia in your dog?



First of all, dogs of any age can develop symptoms - even as young as 4 months old. Sometimes it's noticed alongside the development of osteoarthritis. It can even be mistaken for other conditions such as arthritis.

This is because symptoms include:


These symptoms are all similar to arthritis. But could also be something else like a back injury. So do speak to your veterinary surgeon for advice if you're concerned your dog has any ill health.

Can complementary therapies help dogs with hip dysplasia?



In short, yes! So what holistic approaches can you use?

  1. Joint Supplements. There are many feed supplements you can use, including those with these ingredients - Glucoasmine, chondroitin, green lipped mussel and aloe vera.
  2. Hydrotherapy
  3. Veterinary Physiotherapy
  4. Animal Osteopathy
  5. Veterinary Homeopathy
  6. Veterinary Acupuncture

Which complementary therapy will be best to help your dog with hip dysplasia?



Speak to your veterinary surgeon for advice. If your dog is on any other medication, then always get your vet to confirm a particular supplement will be not only worth using, but safe. As even natural supplements can be very powerful and may not mix with other medicine.

A complementary therapist will always want to work with your vet to give your dog the best chance of good health, and will normally need your vets permission to work with your dog.

If you want to try homeopathy, then there are many veterinary surgeons who've specialised in this therapy. If you'd like help finding a veterinary homeopath near you, please email me at info at taranet.co.uk for advice.

What else can you do to help your dog with hip dysplasia?



You can make management changes to help your dog live as comfortable and happy life as possible. This could include:

  • Using a brace - your vet or veterinary physiotherapist can help with choosing the best one. But these can be for the back or legs. And provide support to help your dog feel more stable and secure in his or her movement.
  • Changing the bedding. There's many different types of beds you can have for your dog. See if your dog seems happy in his or her current bed. Would another one that's less high or softer or more firm be better? Also consider getting a gel mat (often marketed as helping in warmer weather, but can be dual purpose if you choose the right brand), as support under the duvet or whatever your dog is laying on.
  • Support to get in/out of the car. You can get small steps or ramps to help your dog find it easier to get in the car. Or get a hoist (Orvis do great ones, which I recommend), that enable you to help lift your dog's back end. A hoist can be useful also for around the house if your dog has difficulty getting up - particularly if he or she's been laying down for a while and has got stiff.
  • Warmth - This can be linked to bedding. But also you can get mats that provide warmth. And this can be soothing and enjoyable for your dog to lay on. If your dog is getting plenty of good quality rest, it can help improve the quality of life a lot.

Veterinary Research For Dogs With Hip Dysplasia



Please remember that if your horse, dog or other animal is unwell. Or on any kind of medication or other supplement. Then always speak to your Veterinary Surgeon first before using any supplement or therapy. Even natural ones. To avoid any possible issues.

And do you know someone who'd find this helpful? Please share, the more we can spread awareness of the benefits of natural therapies the better! :)

Find out more about other natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

How Green-Lipped Mussels Can Help Animals With Arthritis

How To Relieve Your Pets Arthritis Using This Supplement From The Sea



Arthritis isn’t a health issue affecting only people. But our animals can get arthritis too. Whether it’s our horse, dog, cat or even some other animas.

Like with people. Arthritis can cause issues with mobility for our animals, and also cause pain.

So it’s important to do our best to identify the signs. And take action to stop our horses, dogs and other animals from suffering from this painful condition.

Of course if you’re concerned that your animal has arthritis. Then get a veterinary surgeon to examine your animal as soon as possible.

There are many ways to treat arthritis affecting animals. Including many complementary animal therapies and using different supplements. You can get more information here.

One popular supplement is green-lipped mussel. In this post you can find out more about what green lipped mussel is, and why it may be useful for your animal’s health.

So first of all what is green-lipped mussel? It’s also sometimes known as the New Zealand mussel, as it’s a shellfish native to New Zealand.

This mussel has its name due to having green edges. It became known as having potential medicinal properties. Due to it being a food of the indigenous Maori people of New Zealand. And the Maori people living near the coast, seemed to be less affected by arthritis than those living inland.

Mussels are an important part of the marine environment. And they act as a sea-water filter. Which as the green-lipped mussels grow in the southern oceans. Means they keep many beneficial nutrients.

What do green lipped mussels contain that may help your animal with arthritis?



These mussels contain Chondroitin Sulphate. This is an ingredient common in many arthritis symptom relieving supplements.

They also contain a omega-3 fatty acids. Which are also a common component of many joint health supplements.

Green lipped mussels also contain other minerals and vitamins. Such as zinc, iron, selenium and B-vitamins.

How to choose the best green-lipped mussel supplement for your animal?



As with any supplement, it can be difficult to choose the best one. Despite many marketing and advertisements for different supplements, they can be quite different. Which can mean the body doesn't absorb the ingredients well. Or they may have different strengths of the active ingredient. Some many contain other ingredients, which may or may not be necessary.

Also, it’s important to choose products that are sustainable, and ethically produced. And that the manufacturing process preserves the active ingredients. With no damage to it.

Has there been any veterinary research to prove that green lipped mussels work for animals with arthritis?



Yes there has been several veterinary research studies. This includes the following:


Would you like to know more about how to help stop your animal being affected by arthritis?


Remember.. There can be many reasons for your animal to be showing the symptoms of arthritis - when actually it isn't! Always speak to your veterinary surgeon without delay, if your animal is having mobility issues or is in any sign of pain. Do you want to know what signs to look for to see if your dog is in pain? Take a look here at my advice page.

It's possible your animal could harm him or herself. Or there maybe an underlying health reason that needs diagnosis and treatment.

Lastly… Do you know someone who'd find this helpful? Please share, the more we can spread awareness of the benefits of natural therapies the better! :)

Find out more about other natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.


Love These Brilliant Natural Ways To Help Pets Cope With Excitement

How To Help Stop Your Animal Feel Over-Excited With Natural Therapies


As an animal owner or keeper, you'll see a variety of behaviours. Whether it's your horse, pet, or other animal. And their behaviour will include some level of excitability.

Excitability can be for a range of reasons. For horses, going to a show, or somewhere different can be very exciting. This can be despite our best our best efforts and training.

What Can You Do To Stop Your Pet Feeling Over-Excited



Firstly identify the reason or situation.

Knowing why your animal is feeling excited is the first step. It's ideal if you can take action to reduce the likelihood of excitability in advance.

If you know your animal is likely to face an excitable situation. Then using complementary therapies in advance can be invaluable. For instance use:

  • Herbs - Popular herbs for 'calming' include Valerian, Chamomile and Vervain
  • Homeopathy - Scutellaria is a popular homeopathic remedy to help with excitability
  • Bach Flower Remedies - There are 38 of these remedies. And many will be useful to help your animal at some point during his or her life. Helping with all types of emotional states, including excitability. The best remedy will depend on your individual animal. Also Vervain as mentioned above is not only a herb but part of the Bach system.
  • Massage - There are specialist canine, equine and feline massage therapists. But other animals can find massage useful too! Massage can be soothing and relieve tension and stress. Helping your animal to feel more relaxed generally can be helpful.
  • Natural supplements such as magnesium can also be useful. Find out more here in this Natural Pet Health blog post

If you're faced with an unexpected event, that means your animal is over-excited. What do you do?



  • Bach Flower Remedies are again useful. A combination remedy called "Rescue Remedy" is helpful for "crisis situations".
  • Homeopathy - by using an increased dosage, then scutellaria can be helpful.
  • Tellington Ttouch involves a variety of techniques which help wellbeing. And including in stressful situations. E.g. Using stroking of your horse or pet's ears can be useful to reduce anxiety.

Other ideas to help your animals' excitability



If your animal is prone to excitability then consider what feed and care you're giving.

For example using "Five Element Theory"*. Neutral or cooling foods can be better than having warm foods. Warming foods can enflame an excitable situation. As an example if your dog or cat have chicken or lamb normally and they're a "fire personality". Then these can exacerbate their heat and excitability or other behaviour. Instead duck, rabbit or pork can be better.

*You can find more information on Five Element Theory here. This is the basis of many traditional chinese veterinary medicine techniques.

Remember.. There can be many reasons for your animal to be showing excitable behaviour. If you're in any doubt as to the reason. Or your animal is showing signs of distress, then always speak to your veterinary surgeon without delay.

It's possible your animal could harm him or herself. Or there maybe an underlying health reason that needs diagnosis and treatment.

Lastly… Do you know someone who'd find this helpful? Please share, the more we can spread awareness of the benefits of natural therapies the better! :)

Find out more about other natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.